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  • Avni Gulrajani

Advocacy at the Forefront: Our Day at the Capitol with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention




In the heart of legislative halls, where the future of public policy is debated and shaped, a group of dedicated youth advocates, including myself, embarked on a transformative journey. This journey was not just about advocacy; it was about carrying the voices of those we represent into the corridors of power. During Capitol Day, the YouthLine Legislative Committee, in partnership with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP), stepped into a role that few have the opportunity to fulfill: direct advocacy for bills that can change the landscape of mental health and suicide prevention in our nation.

Our mission was clear: to advocate for three pivotal bills at the crossroads of mental health, public safety, and education. As intervention specialists at YouthLine, we brought a unique perspective informed by honest conversations, real people, and real struggles. Our insights are not just theoretical; they culminate countless hours of listening, supporting, and guiding those in need.


HB 4096: A Lifeline in Times of Crisis

The first bill we championed, HB 4096, proposes establishing a "firearm hold agreement." This groundbreaking initiative would allow individuals who feel they are at risk of self-harm or suicide to store their firearms with federal firearm licensees temporarily. The beauty of this bill lies in its simplicity and direct approach to reducing suicide risks associated with weapons. It's a testament to the belief that preventive measures can save lives and underscores the importance of empowering individuals to take proactive steps toward their safety.


SB 1503: A Comprehensive Approach to Prevention

Next, we rallied for SB 1503, which aims to establish the Task Force on Gun Violence and Suicide Prevention. This bill is not just about studying the nexus between gun violence and suicide; it's about actionable intelligence and strategies that can make a difference. By focusing on support for high-risk populations, de-stigmatization, and firearm safety, SB 1503 addresses the multifaceted nature of suicide prevention. Furthermore, the appropriation of funding for research is a crucial step toward understanding and mitigating the factors that lead to gun violence and suicide.


HB 4070: Strengthening the Foundation of Youth Mental Health

Finally, we supported HB 4070, a bill recognizing schools' critical role in the mental health ecosystem. By directing the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to increase school-based health services through grants, HB 4070 aims to make mental health support more accessible to students. The requirement for OHA to study methods to increase services provided through school-based health centers is a forward-thinking approach to ensuring that our educational institutions can be sanctuaries of support and healing.


Our Voices, Our Impact

As we engaged with state representatives and senators, we shared our professional insights and personal journeys. We spoke of the challenges and triumphs, the moments of despair, and the sparks of hope that define our work at YouthLine. Our conversations were not mere exchanges of information; they were heartfelt dialogues about the potential impact of these bills. We spoke of lives that could be saved, futures that could be reclaimed, and communities that could be transformed.

The opportunity to advocate alongside the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention was an honor and a call to action. It was a reminder that in the halls of power, voices like ours - informed by experience, fueled by passion, and dedicated to change - can make a difference. Our advocacy on Capitol Day was a step towards a future where mental health is not just a priority but a fundamental aspect of our collective well-being.

As we continue our work, we carry the lessons learned and the connections made on Capitol Day. We are more convinced than ever that through informed advocacy, personal engagement, and relentless pursuit of change, we can shape policies that not only address the symptoms but strike at the root of mental health and suicide prevention. Our journey continues, but the path has never been clearer: together, we can create a world where everyone has the support, resources, and hope they need to thrive.

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